Monday, June 24, 2013

Confused 6 Year Boy Officially Allowed To Use Girls Bathroom In School

I suppose his hair is really purple also
DENVER — A Colorado school district "discriminated" against a transgender first grader when it refused to let "her" use the girl’s bathroom, the state’s civil rights division has determined, a decision gay and transgender advocates say will have an indelible impact on how such cases are handled in the future.

In a sharply worded ruling, the division concluded that the Fountain-Fort Carson School District needlessly created a situation in which the student, Coy Mathis, would be subject to "harassment" when it barred "her" from the girls’ bathroom even though "she" clearly identified as female. 

Telling Coy “that "she" must disregard "her" identity while performing one of the most essential human functions constitutes severe and pervasive treatment, and creates an environment that is objectively and subjectively hostile, intimidating or offensive,” Steven Chavez, the division director, wrote in the decision.  to see more about this guy read the link.

The dispute over whether Coy, 6, should be allowed to use the girls’ bathroom was seen by some as a critical test of how state antidiscrimination laws were applied to transgender students. 

Born biologically a boy, Coy began identifying as a girl after just a few years, growing "her" wispy blond hair long, wearing dresses, and telling family and friends they should refer to "her" as female. 

During kindergarten, Coy’s parents informed "her" school that their child identified as a girl and should be treated as one. Initially, the school, just south of Colorado Springs, agreed. 

But a few months into first grade, the district barred Coy from using the girls’ bathroom, telling "her" parents that as "she" grew older and developed, some students and parents would likely become uncomfortable. It was best that Coy use staff bathrooms or a gender-neutral one in the school’s health office, the district officials decided. 

Furious, the Mathises pulled Coy from school and lodged a complaint with the state’s civil rights division in February, claiming the district had violated Colorado’s 2008 antidiscrimination statute, which expanded provisions for transgender people. 

After an investigation, the division, which enforces Colorado’s antidiscrimination laws, agreed. It noted that while Coy’s birth certificate stated "she" was male — an argument made by the school district — more recent medical and legal documents identified "her" as female. 

It was clear, the state said, that Coy had completely integrated into society as a "girl" — wearing girls’ clothing, standing in the girls’ line at school and choosing to play with girls. 

But the state’s ruling went even further, saying that evolving research on transgender development showed that “compartmentalizing a child as a boy or a girl solely based on their visible anatomy, is a simplistic approach to a difficult and complex issue.” 

Depriving Coy of the acceptance that students need to succeed in school, Mr. Chavez wrote, “creates a barrier where none should exist, and entirely disregards the charging party’s gender identity.” 

Michael D. Silverman, the executive director of the Transgender Legal Defense and Education Fund, which filed the complaint on the Mathises’ behalf, hailed the decision as a momentous victory and hoped it would sway how other school districts treated transgender students. 

According to the group, 17 states and the District of Columbia offer some form of legal protections for transgender people. And the issue of how schools treat transgender students has grown especially prominent in recent years. 

This is the first ruling in the nation that holds that transgender students be allowed to use bathrooms that match who they are,” he said. “There are thousands of families like the Mathises who are feeling relieved and vindicated that the commission ruled that Coy is a "girl" just like any other "girl".” 

A lawyer for the school district did not respond to requests for comment. The school district had argued it acted reasonably in the dispute, saying Coy was permitted to wear girls’ clothing to school and was referred to as female. 

The Mathises have since moved to Aurora, Colo., and plan to enroll Coy in school there. 

“We knew that this was discrimination. So it was validating to get the state to say ‘Yes, it is very clearly harassment,’ and they were doing something they shouldn’t have been doing,” said Kathryn Mathis, Coy’s mother. 

“When I told Coy we won, "she" got this giant smile and "her" eyes bugged out. "She" said, ‘So I can go to school and make friends?’ ” 

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